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Even though I am ill, I will not live like a sick person. —Dr. Jinroh Itami

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You may be that person whose life has just been turned upside down with a fearful diagnosis, a multitude of tests, and the long stressful wait for results and/or the new routine of challenging treatments. Furthurmore, co-existing with anxiety and the fear of death often accompany a diagnosis. Yet, you may now have completed treatment and feel adrift with no map or compass to guide you beyond the hospital. All most of us want, is for life to get back to normal. Whatever that is.

I work primarily, but not exclusively, with people facing cancer, as well as caregivers – family and friends.  I hope you will find resources here for navigating your non-medical needs while living with any illness, not only cancer.  This practical, action-oriented and meaningful approach is based on Japanese Psychology and the work of Dr. Jinroh Itami known as Meaningful Life Therapy that consequently made a significant difference to me, during my cancer treatment, and to many others I have worked with.

Stories and Articles

This collection is a work in progress. Every week you will find a new addition as I compile resources. Articles will eventually be categorized and you are free to download or print anything written by me, for your own personal use.

Books

An incomplete list, including children’s stories that I love, poetry, and a variety of non-fiction. These are books that are meaningful to me, and offer something beautiful, useful, humourous and worthwhile on the business of living and dying.

Ted Talks Plus

TED Talks for now.  It is, however, a section that will continue to grow and change as I experiment with new resources, including videos and podcasts. I am always on the lookout for beauty, wisdom, humour and practical application.

Words From People I Have Worked With

Trudy Boyle is the person I recommend to anyone who is challenged by a serious illness. She has three priceless qualities: (1) She has a wealth of valuable knowledge and wisdom collected over the past 25 years; (2) She has personal experience.  She’s been there and she knows what it’s like; and (3) She has a warm and compassionate heart that is the basis of her authenticity and integrity.  If you’re looking for support and guidance, you couldn’t be in better hands.
—Gregg Krech, author and Executive Director ToDo Institute

I have had the remarkable privilege of seeking out Trudy’s leadership in many capacities over numerous years and my intense respect for her and her work, has only deepened.  She is one of the most trusted, tender, and wise leaders I know.  Whether she is developing or facilitating programs, writing, or speaking Trudy shares her insights and wisdom with grace and compassion providing encouragement and tools to help us grow.
—Patti Morris, Executive Director, Wellspring Calgary, Canada

Living Well with Illness/Cancer is a program I have attended through my role as program director at Wellspring Calgary. Trudy’s work is full of thought-provoking ideas, activities and generosity and has provided me with formative and empowering influences in my own life and work. We recognize and appreciate this program as a significant way to reach out to our members as well as those in underserved communities. Thank-you Trudy.
—Anna Carnell, Program Director, Wellspring Calgary, Canada

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The Role of Ikigai in Living Well with Illness

Ikigai is a Japanese word that means something like, “a reason to get up in the morning.”  What lifts your spirits? What gives your life meaning? In Japan, Ikigai is an attribute of longevity. I consider it an attribute of living well with illness. Ikigai is not positive thinking rather it is about purpose. What are things you consider important to do, while you have the chance? Nothing changes without action. Ikigai is about taking action- small steps- everyday that allow you to flourish under all circumstances.

Copyright ©2018 Trudy Boyle and Living Well with Illness. All rights reserved.